Ways to Overcome/Resolve Conflicts in a Relationship

Oct 16, 2017 Daniel Aihie
Relationship is strong, deep, or close association or acquaintance between two that may range in duration from brief to enduring. However, there is no relationship that doesn't have have flaws and a result conflict can come in into your happy relationship. If the these conflict are not settled, it can cause the relationship to end, thereby resulting in what we call "heartbreak". Funny enough the secret to overcoming and settling these conflicts ia actually at our finger tips. Obiaks Blog brings to you, ways to overcome/resolve conflicts in a relationship.

1. Remember not to sweat the small stuff.
Realize that not every disagreement needs to be an argument. Of course, this doesn’t mean you bow to someone else’s demands when it’s something you feel strongly about, but take the time to question the level of importance of the matter at hand.

2. Practice acceptance.
You have not been in this person’s shoes, and while it may help to try to put yourself in them, your partner is the only person who can really explain where he or she is coming from.

3. Exercise patience.
Granted, it’s hard to remember this in the heat of the moment. But stopping to take a few deep breaths, and deciding to take a break and revisit the discussion when tensions are not as high, can sometimes be the best way to deal with the immediate situation.

4. Lower your expectations.
The best way to clarify this is to ask what another’s expectations are in a scenario. This is not to say you should have low expectations but it is to say that you should keep in mind you may have different expectations. 

5. Remember you both desire harmony.
Most likely, you both want to get back on track and have a peaceful relationship. Also remember the feeling of connectedness that you want to feel. It’s hard to feel threatened by someone when you see yourselves as interconnected and working towards the same result.

6. Focus on the behavior of the person and not their personal characteristics.
Personal attacks can be far more damaging and long-lasting. Talk about what behavior upset you instead of what is “wrong” with someone’s personality.

7. Clarify what the person meant by their action, instead of what you perceived their action to mean.
Most of the time, your partner is not deliberately trying to hurt you, and getting hurt happened to be a byproduct of that action.

8. Keep in mind your objective is to solve the problem, rather than win the fight.
Resist the urge to be contrary just for that reason. Remember that it’s better to be happy than right!

9. Accept the other person’s response.
Once you have shared your feelings as to what a person’s actions meant to you, accept their responses. If they tell you the intended meaning of their action was not as you received it, take that as face value.

10. Leave it in the past.
Once you’ve both had the opportunity to share your side, mutually agree to let it go. Best case scenario, your discussion will end in a mutually satisfactory way. If it doesn’t, you may choose to revisit it later. When making this decision, ask yourself how important it is to you. If you make the decision to leave it in the past, do your best to do that, rather than bringing it up again in future conflicts. Conflict can be distressing. If you see it as an opportunity for growth, it can help you become closer and deepen your relationship.